Temperature Units - (n.)

Degrees Celsius (°C): Introduced by a Swedish astronomer, Andres Celsius, 1°C is defined as 1/100 of the temperature difference between water freezing point and boiling point by a pressure of 1 atmosphere. The thermometer freezing point is 0° and the boiling point is 100°.

Degrees Fahrenheit (°F): Named for the German-born scientist, Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit, 1 °F is defined as 1/180 of the temperature difference between water freezing point and boiling point. The thermometer freezing point is 32° and the boiling point is 212°.

Degrees Kelvin (°K): Invented by William Thomson, Lord Kelvin, a 19th Century British scientist, this scale is based upon the fact that the coldest it can get (theoretically) is -273.15 degrees Celsius. The value, -273.15 degrees Celsius, is called "absolute zero." At this temperature it is thought that molecular motion stops. Since it cannot get any colder than 273.15 °C, the Kelvin scale uses this number as zero. Its unit, the degree Kelvin, is equal to the degree Celsius.

Conversion Equations:
  1. To convert Fahrenheit to Celsius use:
         Celsius = (Fahrenheit 32) * 5/9

  2. To convert Celsius to Fahrenheit use:
         Fahrenheit = (Celsius * 9/5) +32

  3. To convert Celsius to Kelvin use:
         Kelvin = Celsius + 273